Secret to Writing Great Dialogue

Struggling to make your dialogue authentic? Try eavesdropping. On the bus. In restaurants. Standing in line at the check-out. It doesn’t matter where you do it- just make sure you have a notebook handy.

Look for:

  • The pauses between the conversation, and where the speakers pick up and drop off from each other
  • How one person dominates or leads
  • Unusual expressions or contractions
  • How it flows

Earwigging on random conversations is a time-honoured technique used by countless well known writers.

As Charles Haas (screenwriter- Gremlins 2, Matinee and Over the Edge) said:

“I do pay attention to what people are saying. I think it’s a good writing technique because it builds up one’s ear for dialogue and vernacular.”

The most convincing dialogue comes from real people in real situations. By listening to how people talk to each other you can identify different speech patterns and come up with some great lines. Plus, if you’re a bit nosy like me, you can have a lot of fun too!

My favourite eavesdrop came a few weeks ago at a pub in Shepherd’s Bush.

‘I don’t fancy locust, babe,’ a man said into his cell-phone shaking his head and sleeving beer foam off his top lip.

I’ve no idea what they were talking about but I am glad I wasn’t invited round for supper.

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2 thoughts on “Secret to Writing Great Dialogue

  1. Dialogue doesn’t always have to be authentic to be enjoyable. One of the most enjoyable writers of dialogue for me was Robert B. Parker in his Spenser books. The interchanges between Spenser and his sidekick Hawk were terse and wonderful, but hardly representative of regular conversations.

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